It’s hard to convince clients to use SQL 2014

SQL Server 2014 has been released since the 1st of April and there are some really cool features that might help you and your organization and can definitely justify an upgrade. In my job as a SQL consultant, I have a lot of different customers and none of them is currently working on SQL Server 2014 or is planning to upgrade to this new version. I find it really hard to convince my clients to upgrade or even install it for a brand new installation.

Why is it so hard to convince people to start using SQL Server 2014…? After questioning my customers I figured out these 5 reasons?

I don’t trust it

This is probably the most famous argument of my customers. They don’t trust the new version because it has just been released and has probably a lot of bugs. Let’s wait till the first service pack has been released, and then we know it is stable… Most of my clients are telling me that there are just too many risks to install an RTM version of SQL Server. “What happens if something happens and we’re not prepared for it?” I don’t think Microsoft will release a version of SQL Server that is not stable or not fully tested. It’s true that in the beginning of a new release, more bugs are found, but I wouldn’t state that the new release is unstable. Microsoft is still releasing Service Packs and Cumulative Updates for older versions of SQL Server. Does this mean that this software is unstable? Well.., no…, because you’re probably using it right now. Bug fixes are always part of the software despite if it’s a new or old version.

Oh, is there a new release?

I’ve noticed that many people don’t know that a new version has been released. They just install the older version of which they know of. Or they have heard about a new release but are not aware of all the new cool functionalities that can be a benefit for their company. And that is where we, the SQL Family, come in. We are trying to make people aware of all these new features with SQL events, webinars, workshops, blogs,…

My vendor doesn’t support it yet…

Another reason that I hear a lot is that the vendor of a software package (which is using a SQL database), does not support the new version yet. I even had to install a brand new SQL Server 2005 last month because the vendor didn’t support another version… I told my customer to get rid of that software and find a good alternative. The vendor’s software will probably work on SQL Server 2014 but if you should use it, you will lose your full support on the software… Try the upgrade advisor and see if there is some exotic configuration that will not be working anymore. I doubt it… I usually send the report to my customer and the supplier. And I’ve noticed lately that suppliers are giving me a good response that they will support SQL Server 2014 in a next major release.

It’s too expensive

Upgrading to a new version of SQL Server is a project that requires some investments. Not only the license cost but also new hardware, re-coding your application, testing … Many customers are complaining that the enterprise edition has become really expensive but do they really need the enterprise edition? From SQL Server 2008 onwards, you can use the DMV sys.dm_db_persisted_sku_features to view all enterprise edition-specific features that are enabled in the current database. If they do need the enterprise edition, it might worth starting a consolidation project instead of and upgrade project to save license costs.

The upgrade can also save you money because new features can save resources like page and row compression, resource governor or the new T-SQL improvements can save your developers a lot of time.

No time, too much work

I hear this a lot… “Upgrade…? Sorry but we don’t have time for that… Why should we upgrade, the database is working just fine and we have other more important things on our agenda.” I don’t think that it has something to do with “no time”. Some people are just not motivated to do an upgrade. It’s hard to convince people that are not willing to learn and are not open to new ideas. And maybe that’s because of the above mentioned point, they don’t trust the software and it will cost the company a lot of money.

I don’t know if I’m the only one that is experiencing this is :) ? But I hope that I can change the perception of my clients … but it’s a tough job… believe me…

2 comments on “It’s hard to convince clients to use SQL 2014
  1. Pieter, you are not alone in that game. We work for Fortune 500s and they have all the resources on the planet (as you can imagine) and again – we cannot see wide + fast adoption. What we actually see is just a small, tiny, little portion of them that are going “all in” when a new release comes and they are doing them not for their core business systems! It is really hard to convince them to shift to the latest and greatest and the most frequent reason I see for that is the first one you mentioned – fear. Fear of possible problems…

  2. Pieter, Yes, I agree with Boris.
    I’m working with Forture 500s company and managing all the SQL Server Versions from 2000 to 2012.
    There are several critical servers on which third party applications are running and they are supporting until 2000 or 2005.
    For some of the in-house developed application, they are all set with this and for years, it is running without any issue. Their question is when the application is comfortably running for years without any issues and fulfilling all the requirements, what is the necessary to upgrade ? Being a DBA, I am clueless to justify them. I mean to say in most of the cases performances only not the factor or deal. There are several other things that are all to be complied.
    And the License costing, it’s really pain in the bud to me as one of my last year’s accomplishment is to knock out as much as possible migration (degrade) of Enterprises Edition.
    Being a DBA in contrary, I studied how to remove the Table partitioning from to get rid of the Enterprises Edition.

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